Out from Under the Fashion Rock: TOPSHOP’s Tall Range

I love clothes, but in order to avoid temptation, I avoid temptation. I evade shopping sites, shopping malls and other specific stores so I will not be tempted to buy, buy, buy. I digest fashion trends by reading blogs and basically just seeing what the ladies are wearing.

That preamble serves to explain to you why I never knew that Vancouver’s TOPSHOP has a tall section! What the WHAT!

I have been into TOPSHOP before, but I didn’t give it a solid look-through because typically clothes that are mass produced (like H & M) and at a lower price point generally don’t have a hope in hell of fitting me correctly. But if they have a dedicated tall section- that’s a whole other bowl of string beans.

Last week, I posted this hilarious Buzz Feed article on Facebook and most of my tall friends mentioned how much they laughed at the point about rompers and skirts. I maintain that I get a horrid frontal wedgie or “camel toe” as we so adoringly call it if a romper will ever fit me at all. So, imagine my surprise when….

ENTER: ROMPER ON A TALL LADY

One of my best friends who is getting married in less than a week rocked a ROMPER from TOPSHOP to her stagette on Saturday!

I can’t find the exact print she was wearing, but here is the link to an adorable yellow one– same cut and lace detail in the back. PS- the British call it a “playsuit.” How adorable is that? Makes me want one even more.

But for the heck of it, here is the only image I have from the evening of the lovely Jenna 5’10” wearing her romper! Looking fab in your playsuit and bachelorette sash!

Jenna RomperAnd for fun, I started a Pinterest board of some quick picks from TOPSHOP. (Which was dangerous- I almost have a basket full!)

Stay tuned for some fun in-store finds, coming soon!

Tall Lady at Her First Blogger Event!

A blogger event? Me? I felt like I would be an imposter. Yes, I have a blog, but I have been inconsistent at my postings, but recently, I have made the decision to go all-in. But I didn’t think I would fit in with a group of well-established professional bloggers. But I was wrong, because apparently, by nature, my fellow Vancouver  bloggers are friendly, funny, helpful and supportive. That’s how I wound up there in the first place, by a new connection, the lovely Eschelle of Mumfection, who coaxed me and made me feel like not belonging was not an option.

I wanted to share some highlights with you, and some things I learned about my first blogger event.

The Introduction and forming of a Tall Lady Legion

At the beginning of the night before the speakers began, they decided we could go around the room and introduce ourselves, And of course, they started with me. By complete fluke. I didn’t even think geographically that made sense based on room formation, but that was probably cause I was being a chicken.

“Hi everyone, my name is Yvonne… my blog is Who’s That Tall Lady dot com…” and before I could go on, one by one, two other tall ladies in the room stood up. I love it when the Tall Ladies stand together! I didn’t have a chance to talk to them both, but check out Angela Crocker’s website and blog. Angela chatted with me a bit later and I shared with her some of my insecurities about blogging and she gave me some very helpful advice.

I Need To Get Better at Documenting!

Don’t forget to take pics! I really need to remember to take more pictures. I took one. That was it. See below. It’s of food, so I figure that’s a good start!

Neverland

The delicious and beautiful treats provided at Neverland Tea Salon!

Get my Tweet on: As it was a Parent Bloggers Unite event (and no, I’m not even a parent- how inclusive are they?), the hashtag was #PBUYVR. I also learned I need to just get a liiiiittle bit faster at Tweeting.  I find it difficult to tweet, though, and make sure I am not missing any of the valuable information being shared by Nicole Christen, guest speaker, founder and CEO of My Real Review.

I was sitting beside blogger and fitness industry expert Dai Manuel and before I even realized that people were tweeting, I opened Twitter and Dai had already tweeted about 37 times. Insightful and interesting Tweets about what Nicole was saying. I guess with live-Tweeting and the fitness, you only improve if you practice!

Get Proper Business Cards

I have proper business cards for my 9-5, but I don’t have them to represent my blogger-self. I had to get by and felt uber rinky-dink by handing out my work business cards with my blog URL scrawled on them.

And Last But Not Least…. Write to Write

It was great to hear Nicole reiterate that while there is opportunity to monetize blogs, she reminded us to “write to write” if that’s why we started in the first place. For me, it definitely is, and I wanted to write something I would find interesting, and hope that I could reach others, too. The community, the great people I meet through blogging… that is all a huge bonus!

Until next time!

Yvonne

 

New Shoe Line | Why I Have Waited So Long to Talk About Shoes

Today, I am very proud to educate you about a fashionable new shoe line!

Upper Street by Nicole Smallwood

Stylish and sexy, this line just launched at the beginning of October and was deigned by Nicole Smallwood for Upper Street London. Here are a few major highlights:

  • They range from size 10 – 12.5, and you can also select the width.
  • They are CUSTOMIZABLE (you heard me). You can chose from two heel heights, if the style permits – mid OR high!
  • They are SUPER customizable (yeah, I know I just said that, but wait for it…) you can also customize other features, like colour and fabric. So cool!
  • The fabric quality is very high and the shoes have extra cushioning for comfort.
  • Nicole Smallwood is a celebrity stylist with over 12 years experience in the fashion industry, and co-founder of Upper Street, Katy Chandler, is  no stranger to the struggles of looking for fashionable footwear, being a size 11.5. Sounds like a match made in heaven!

Yes, they are priced on the higher end, but how great would it feel to be the gal on the receiving end of this sentiment: “Oh my god, I LOVE your shoes… where did you get them?”

***

Time to Talk Shoes

You may have noticed that I have never broached the topic of footwear for tall ladies, who typically have larger feet. (Or it never occurred to you. Either or.)

Alas, I have been avoiding it. It’s because it’s a sensitive subject. I have worried that I might alienate my readers, but then I realized that of course I need to talk about shoes- it is in the interest of my readers! So, without further adieu, here it is:

I have abnormally small feet for someone who is my height. I’m an 8 – 8.5. I realize that other tall ladies consider me incredibly lucky. I’ve been called a freak and been on the receiving end of many a-hateful glares from fellow tall ladies.  Rest assured, I am sure my balance suffers a significant amount because of this. My friend, Michelle, maintains that I am a marvel of physics because I should just tip over. (Sometimes, I do.)

I recently realized, though, that not looking into larger footwear options is not helpful to my community. I hope you like the first instalment!

 

I missed this article a few months back. Very interesting. Some quick takeaways:
– Napoleon was actually tall compared to the average Frenchman of the time!
– People who are at a “height disadvantage” have many health challenges, but so do tallies.
– I have referred to “heightism” before in reference to being overlooked for movie roles because of being too tall, but clearly, this happens a lot to those on the other end of the spectrum.
– I am shocked about the salary information!
– Like the young ladies featured in the “Tall Girls” movie, people who are shorter also take drastic measures to change their appearance. Surgery for two and a half inches of height? Ouch.

Tall Lady’s Backhanded Compliment Library, First Edition

Occasionally, I get a real compliment which could be mistaken as an insult, or in some cases, as in the situation below, I get a detour. I thought this conversation was going to lead me straight into treacherous falling rocks, but instead, it quickly deeked onto a path which lead me to a gondola that flew me up the self-esteem mountain. (Did I drag that metaphor out too far?… You get it. Mountain.)

SETTING: In a high-school cafeteria. Several kids from varying social stratospheres are sitting spaced out at a table together during a “spare” or “open” period. Typical high school chatter takes place. Tall girl is sitting, listening, but not really engaged.

POPULAR BOY WHO DOESN’T USUALLY TALK TO TALL GIRL: Yvonne, you remind me of Ethel.

TALL GIRL: [Says nothing, as can only think of one Ethel in popular culture and looks up with a furrowed brow as she knows this is not a compliment]

POPULAR BOY: You know, from Archie.

TALL GIRL: [Sighs, still remaining silent, not wanting to encourage this conversation. Yes, I know Ethel from Archie. She’s a gangly dork who everyone runs away from in the Archie comics. Why would I encourage this conversation?]

POPULAR BOY: You know, she was a dork but then when she showed up at her high school reunion she was a supermodel.

TALL GIRL: [Oh. Dumbfounded and is struggling to utter something resembling A WORD in the English language. Quietly…] oh, thank you.

End scene.

I remember being so confused. I was not part of the most popular crowd and got very little attention from boys. I never mistook this conversation for this boy liking me, but I really appreciated the moment he took to share this insight with me. I knew I wasn’t some kind of freak, but given my astounding number of boyfriends in high school (ZERO), I thought I was considered a different species as a girl who was taller than most of the guys.

So thanks. It was nice to hear. My supermodel career never did come to fruition, though.

For Amanda Todd

No one deserves to be bullied. No one earns it, no one asks for it,

it isn’t a rite of passage.

Bullying has to stop.

Christy Clark, Premier of British Columbia

 

This week, BC has been struck with tragedy, but as you know, the impact and implications of this loss are exponential.

I have spent the morning watching local news reactions and fallout from the suicide of Amanda Todd, a fifteen year old Coquitlam, BC teenager who could no longer bear the torment of her bullies. For her to take such extreme actions can mean that she could not conceive an end to her pain, the cyber bullying, the abuse, whether at school or otherwise.

I wanted to write a post about this, not because it has anything to do with being tall, but for so, so many reasons:

 – Because as women, many, if not most of us, are deeply affected by praise for our looks, and sometimes blindly so. As Amanda shares in her YouTube video posted one month before her suicide, she “got called stunning, beautiful, perfect etc…” followed by the request to flash which she fulfilled. I have no doubt that thousands of other girls have done the same; however, in this instance, the receiver took advantage of the opportunity to black mail her. 

– Because our society is working so very, very hard to prevent bullying and Amanda and her family want her video shared as part of her legacy. How are we working to prevent it, and what can you do?  Through anti-bullying websites, kids help phones, support programs, many of which you can find in your area by Googling “Stop bullying.”

– Because as someone who hopes to be a parent someday, it is my responsibility to accept that I need to educate my child to behave online as if each and every interaction were face to face. And I also need to accept that I cannot just cut my child off from accessing the Internet, or monitoring their every move because that will breed distrust and will not change behaviours. 

– Because you have either been bullied, witnessed bullying, or been the bully. And anything you can do to stop it from happening helps, even if you think it won’t make much of a difference. We hear it again and again, that one voice, one hand, one person who cared made all the difference. Bullying damages us. To this moment, I can tell you several insecurities I have were bred from the bullying I experienced as a teenager.

In Amanda’s case, she did have a strong support network, although there was something that occurred just this week that made her feel entirely alone and that her struggle was futile. 

In memory of Amanda, and in your experience of bullying in whatever form it was in, please commit to doing your part to end bullying.